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Who are you? When asked this question, let’s say at a social event, do you respond by offering your name, where you work, what hobbies you enjoy, or your religious affiliation and associations? And are those details representative of the truth of your being?

We all tend to define ourselves by our names, occupations, roles, relationships, and beliefs. Are these descriptive of the energy that drives your heartbeat, or can they bring two cells together to create a new life?

The standard response to the question “Who am I?” is with some sort of local, temporary identification. Being attached to any identity such as this prevents the truth of your essence from coming forth. As long as we limit ourselves to a finite description of ourselves, we will perpetuate our current, relatively powerless paradigm. The truth is that while we can be defined by those types of characterizations, which would include roles like husband and wife, father and son, mother and daughter, and so forth, and while it often helps us in our social interactions to communicate on the level of those details, we are also so much more. Transcending each of our fixed, local, and temporary identities assists us in moving through our limited human perceptions much faster.

It is common to create an identity attached to traumas we have experienced. We merge with our experiences and come to know ourselves through them. In the case of trauma, we may define ourselves as wounded, broken, or resilient. When we refer to ourselves enough by a name or a feeling, this idea becomes crystallized within the psyche. Once we attach our meaning to one of these concepts, it becomes a reference point for the origin of our thoughts, beliefs, and general outlook of the world.

This is an important distinction because who we believe ourselves to be can be a source of limitation. If you define yourself as insignificant from a childhood trauma, then your thoughts will originate from this wound. You then create beliefs, emotions and experiences to support that reality.

Softening up these hard, crystallized states of being allows for more fluidity in every aspect of our participation with life.

Crystallized Identity Exercise

Fill in the blank with a characteristic that you believe describes you: I am __________.

Now, bring that statement into your heart and feel if it is heavy or light.

If it feels heavy or dense, it is not your truth. If it feels light, it is.

When an undesirable quality shows up as “light” then recognize the resonance within yourself.

Acknowledge it is a temporary aspect of your personality, and accept it is there. Remember at its root, this undesirable quality is Source energy and you have a temporary distortion of that energy.

Bring that original statement back to your heart. Is it heavy or light?